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Using the Restoration Hardware Finish to Fix a Problem

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A pile of tables were given to me.  I know.  I am so very lucky.

tables

The table I worked on this weekend was the one at the back in this picture.  I know I should have taken a better picture of the table, but in true form I just got in the mood to paint and jumped in.  It is how I operate when a lot is going on.  Paint first, think later.
The tables had been in a vacant house left by previous renters and this one was in pretty rough shape.
I fell in love with particular table because I have an identical one that is in great shape from my mom.   My table is a family piece that I would get grounded if I painted.  This one I am free to do what I want to.

I spray painted the legs with chalk spray paint I picked up at Walmart.  I liked the paint but frankly it wasn’t worth the extra cost for the chalk finish.  I should have just purchased flat white paint.


This table at one point sat under a leak and had water stains along with a water ring that just wouldn’t come out, even with sanding the finish off.  I tried my darkest stain, Minwax Jacobean, and the stain still showed through.  Bummer.


I knew I wanted the top of the table to be stained with the bottom painted, so I knew I needed a solution to my water problem.  The solution was my Restoration Hardware Weathered Oak Finish for the top.

I figured out this finish through trial and error and have used it several times like here on the bathroom vanity in our suburban house

dresser to bathroom vanity

and here on the top and sides of the Funky Dresser

Funky Dresser

It is a finish that covers a lot of flaws and is almost foolproof.  This finish is the most popular post on my blog, so I guess I am not alone in using the simple process.

Pickling Stain on top of the stained wood then wipe off in the direction of the wood grain almost immediately.


It always looks a little nasty at this point and every time I second guess my decision.

The next step is to apply a coat of Jacobean stain over the top.


Wipe off the excess stain with the grain and voila- the water rings disappear.

I sanded the paint slightly on the legs and will ne adding a clear protective finish to the top of the table once I am sure the stain has dried completely.


It turned out great and gave me the satisfaction of getting one project done this past weekend.

I don’t know where this table will end up, but I really think it is pretty.

I hope you were productive this last weekend,

Blessings,

Karen

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Roadside Repurposed Dresser

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We found this beauty sitting on the side of the road outside a rental house.  There wasn’t much I loved about the piece except that it had some great French Provincial hardware hiding under layers of paint but I just couldn’t leave it sitting on the curb waiting for heavy trash pick up.

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We stopped and got the dresser along with this piece I am still thinking about what to do with it but I am thinking gray and creamy white.
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After a month of the ugly lavender dresser sitting in our garage I decided that this was the weekend to get busy and do something with the piece. Because the piece was not real wood and had some areas that the fake wood had gotten wet and was swollen, I knew it would need a lot of sealing.  First it all got primed with Zinzer primer then I made my own version of chalk paint for the second coat out of a grayish, greenish OOPS paint sitting in the garage that I thought would work for the piece. Here is a trick if you like the look and feel of latex paint with poly on top for durability but like the way that chalk paint will cover nasty surfaces, use one coat of chalk paint then sand lightly, then paint over it with the latex paint.

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After painting the whole piece I could see it still needed additional help.
I decided  to take the dresser in a whole different direction.

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I took off the French Provincial hardware and added cedar fencing we picked up when our neighbors changed out their fence.  One board covered the front of each dresser drawer, one to cover the bottom part and three to cover the top.  Only one board needed to be cut down narrower on the table saw. After the boards were nailed on, I gave them a good sanding to bring out the color of the wood.

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The hardware I decided to use out of my hoard was some shiny brass hardware that had been given to me by a neighbor. A coat of Rustoelum Flat spray paint designed for metal was just the ticket to getting the look I wanted. My math-minded husband figured out where the pulls needed to go on the dresser and drilled the holes so that they would line up vertically.

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Here he is in all his glory. No one would guess that this dresser was a cheap, feminine, not wood dresser headed for a landfill.

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It is going to be a gift for a hard-working friend.

What do you think about the finished $2.00 project?

I would love to hear from you.

Blessings,

Karen

Rustic Deer Head

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I saw this fall mantle at Its Overflowing as a fall mantle.  The rustic deer head really spoke to me. Last year when we moved in to the burbs I decided that Christmas needed to remind us of our favorite place, Star Hill not a tract home in a master planned neighborhood.  I spent a week creating deer heads and rustic elements.  One of them was a giant stained deer silhouette but it sold almost immediately when I wrote the blog so I knew that a new mantle piece was needed.  I have a whole Pinterest page dedicated to deer head.  Feel free to check out my Pinterest Boards here.

When I saw the fall mantle at Its Overflowing, I knew I had found it!

Rustic hunter mantel decor  maybe with a different design???

Mantle at Its Overflowing

The DIY is simple.

I laid out a bunch of cedar fence pickets that we picked up on the side of the road a month ago. I only had to cut one to get the haphazard look I wanted.

There are no pictures at this point.  The camera was in the house and I was on a roll so I didn’t stop.

I sketched out a rustic deer head with chalk- using a wet rag to fix my boo boo’s.  we decided to leave all the pieces loose while it was being cut out.  I planned on cutting it out myself but…

I discovered that at  the lake house we dont have our scroll saw right now, but there is a jig saw there.  I hate jig saws.  Hubby had to man it because it bounces so much.

I ran inside to get the camera but Hubby got impatient and started cutting.

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I carefully turned everything over after it was all cut out and attached scrap wood to the back to secure the pieces together using a an air nailer.

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All in all we have about fifty cents in materials into the project.

I know that this is not something for everyone, but I love it.  It is restful to me and the simplicity makes me think of an old home Christmas.

What do you think about our finished project?

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I still need to get some white tapers for the small candle sticks but we are just about done.

I hope you have a wonderful day,

Thank you for taking the time to read my posts.  I appreciate your comments.

Blessings,

Karen

 

Burn Pile Barn Door

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Today I am going to show you the amazing barn door I made from wood that was destined for the burn pile.

close up of barn door

I have an odd obsession with things saved from the trash.

I own (or it owns me depending who you talk to) a rescue dog.

lumi nose

I cheer every year when this rose blooms because Mr. Math mowed over it twice trying to get rid of it before giving up and leaving it alone.

hardy rose

I have saved several pieces of furniture from the trash or the burn pile. They are some of my favorite projects.

the finished vanity

 

Burn Pile Vanity

roadside credenza

 

Roadside Credenza

Finished Mudroom Bench

 

Mudroom Bench

My dad, the original junker in our family, had some cedar cut on his property on “halves “. Basically that means he got half of the wood and the person who cut it into lumber got half for payment. Some of the cedar had imperfections that went into the cull pile. It was wormy , or bowed or split.

cedar lumber

 

Cedar Windfall

My dad saved that wood for me. He knew I would want it. My dad knows me well, I did. There was a lot more wood than I expected , and it has been consuming almost a third of the Garagemahal for almost a year drying. I wasn’t sure what this wood would become but I knew that one day I would find a home for it.

I found a home for some when The Social Planner’s son bought a FEMA trailer that he and his dad are gutting and turning into a cool home for this single guy who works on yachts in a very expensive bayside community.

fema trailer turned to solar powered rv dubbed emergency response studio 14   From FEMA Trailer to Solar Powered Studio and Home

You might check out what people are doing with these trailers online.  They were filled with formaldehyde when they were built for families after the hurricane decimated New Orleans and were dumped by the government as soon as possible.   You can pick one up for a couple of thousand dollars now but they need all the junk on the inside removed.

The look he is going for is rustic industrial. I can’t wait to get some shots of the inside.  Right now the kitchen is done but everything else is under construction.

We made the door quickly out of some of the cedar.

First we sorted out the wood and put it out on the floor to look at and move around then cut them all to length.

cedar door cedar planks sawdust cedar boards

 

Next we clamped the wood and added a board at the top, bottom and across diagonally to make a Z.

clamped cedar barn door

z barn door

 

Here it is finished.  The door has five coats of polyurethane on all the door and seven inside the crevices.

the finished barn door close up of the door close up of barn door

It is going to look amazing in the trailer along with this piece that is going to be a counter once it is coated with bar coating.

cedar counter

I hope you all had a wonderful weekend.

Thank you for reading my blog.  I appreciate hearing from you.

 

Blessings,

Karen

The Things I Do Not Throw Away

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This weekend we cut up some double bed foot boards and turned them into arms for benches. That meant that parts of the foot boards had to be removed.

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Some people would have thrown the cut off parts away.

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Let’s face it, some people would have thrown the double beds away. Since I was able to pick up all five of these beds for a total of $77.00, they are not very valuable these days, but I digress.

Back to the stuff I don’t throw away. I keep all the solid wood pieces cut off and try to reuse them. Here is a sample of the things I had laying around the Garagemahal this weekend:

I never, ever, throw away a chair or table leg.
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I have even been known to rescue legs out of trash cans. At garage sales.

But look what they become:  Building a bench from table legs.

building a bench from table legs

I don’t throw away solid wood boards. I keep it and it always seems to find a purpose. These old fence boards became my reclaimed wood wall. This was cedar wood taken down and headed for the landfill.

reclaimed fencing washed

It turned into this: Reclaimed wood wall
reclaimed wood wall title

I don’t throw away drawers or even drawer fronts if the drawer is shot because I have used them for a lot of projects. Here is my sweet daughter in law’s Christmas gift to her buddies last year:

drawer front christmas gifts

I do not throw away hardware. Hinges, knobs, handles, and even screws get saved. It may not work on the current project, but it has been my experience that I will need something as soon as I get rid of it. I even buy odd hardware at garage sales and thrift stores.
art deco hardware

I also don’t throw away cut off sections of anything that was solid wood. This section of a door we cut off to make a headboard became a coat rack in my office.
coat rack

I am not sure what I will be doing with the sections of headboard I saved… Do you have any suggestions?
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I also save wood. Because we save every usable scrap, even scrap from building sites and out at heavy trash pick up, we don’t have to buy as much new wood. I love reclaimed wood and will keep every scrap until it is too small to save.

Paint gets used down to the last drop. I love buying oops paint when I can, but I am pretty picky about my paint (Behr paint with primer), so I do buy a lot full price and it is expensive. It gets treated like it is, too. I make sure the lids are sealed and try not to waste. When I am trying out a color, I always buy the sample first to make sure I love it.

I am not alone in the saving. When I visited Jeff at Facelift Furniture, he had this whole storage unit full of bits and parts. I have a feeling that most furniture repurposes are savers of spare parts.
Facelift work space

I guess I am a hoarder. My husband accused me of being one this weekend when I was digging the spindles we removed from the trash can. I prefer to think I am doing my part to save the environment. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

“Franken Furniture” on the Back Porch

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We have started creating an oasis on the back porch. I totally blame Sweet Amanda for the porch color scheme and Baby Boy for the name- the Skittle porch. He says that is what all the colors look like. A bag of skittles.

Here is the inspiration cushion.
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The turquoise chairs moved in the first day, along with the beverage station. The plants were brought over a couple of weeks ago. The new owners of our city house babysat them for us until we were able to pick them up. This weekend a project I have been very excited about made the trip from the Garagemahal to the Skittle porch.

Remember this roadside find? It was a tip from a friend that led us out in the rain to collect this table.

This drop leaf beauty was warped and sitting in the rain, but solid wood.table roadside

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Remember the last roadside find from the City House? I got the coral legged end tables and also the cloven hoof coffee table. The glass was in tact and solid. I have plans for the brass feet too!

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Hubby came up with a great plan to marry the two roadside finds for a table on our back porch. I am loving it. He even used left over pickets from the lake house porch makeover to make the crazy spider like legs you see under the glass. I love that the only new purchase we had to make for this entire project was the bolts that connect the top to the base. The paint is red tomato by Behr. We had this left over from the bookcase makeover at Star Hill. Here is the finished project. I love the look. It is bright but the glass makes it seem lighter and more airy. IMG_3263 IMG_3266

I love the bright colors and how the pieces fit together. The lantern is a clearance find from Marshalls.

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The brightly colored serving dish is one of three I got at Goodwill for $1.99 each. I will be using them a lot on the back porch.

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I even found a Skittle rug at Target!

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Dresser to Mudroom Bench

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My mudroom bench started life as a dresser. I found it on the side of the road waiting for heavy trash pick up. It was a mess! The top was in pieces and two drawers were broken. In spite of the shape that the dresser was in, it was solid wood and had dove tailed drawers. It was late at night and we were headed home from visiting friends. I had to beg Hubby to stop, back up and get out to look at the dresser. He was less than impressed with this one.

What I Know and Don;t Know About Old Furniture

Here it is with one of the working drawers out. The top has a split all the way down the length.

After staring at it a few weeks, I decided to turn it into a piece for our entryway that could serve as a sort of mudroom. A place to take off shoes, hang jackets and hats and hide junk…I mean Hubby’s treasures.

First, We removed the top two rows of drawers from the dresser and created a bench by adding a plywood top.

Turning a Dresser into a Mudroom Bench Part 2

Next, we created a separate top piece from the two remaining solid drawer fronts. Because of the height, we had them open on hinges. We could not have used it if it were drawers. A sheet of beadboard paneling, 2X4’s, and a plywood box.

Mudroom Bench Part 3

The mirror was a thrift store find. Hubby chopped the top off the mirror frame and routed the 2X4’s so that they matched the mirror. We reused the top in a later piece.

Then, Hubby created a board and batten over bead board back to connect the piece visually. The bead board and top are connected together, but they float over the bench. Sneaky huh? This allows easy installation and access to electrical without cutting holes in the wood. You never know where it will live next! All the hooks were installed last because I wasn’t sure what I wanted. In the end I went with plain hooks because they worked for the piece.

The Mudroom Bench is Coming Together

The Finished Mudroom Bench

Finally, we painted, added crystal knobs and made a tufted cushion. I love the soft green color!
The Finished Mudroom Bench

The Finished Mudroom Bench
This is by far the most unique piece of furniture in our home and is a great conversation piece.
The Finished Mudroom Bench

Here it what it looked like the morning that I wrote this blog. I did not do anything so that you can see how we really live.

mudroom bench

This is the best shot I have taken of the bench. Now I wish I had removed Hubby’s hat, camera, and jacket!

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